New Questions:
GROWTH
How is growth measured as defined by the test developer?
What are the DC averages?
What is the national average or norm?
WHAT IS YOUR SUGGESTION FOR AN ACHIEVABLE TARGET/MINIMUM LEVEL ACCEPTABLE FOR GROWTH? (so if we go with a yes/no dichotomous scoring scheme)
WHAT IS YOU SUGGESTION FOR A REACH/IDEAL TARGET FOR GROWTH? (so if we go with a low/mid/high performance three tiered scoring scheme)

The Family Reading Journal and accompanying rubric (vetted by the National Center for Family Literacy) were designed to assess parents’ use of National Center for Family Literacy recommended best practices for reading with children. The assessment is designed to promote family reading and use of reading strategies with very young children (infant to school age), to encourage reflection on the family reading experience, and to be appropriate to varying ages of children and parent literacy levels. ESF Family Reading Journal entries are completed by adult students after reading books with their children. Each journal entry reflects the name of the parent and child, the title of the book, the date it was read, and a response to the family reading experience related to an objective on the rubric. The rubric records a parent’s cumulative score over the course of the semester/school year. Trained staff calculate the total score achieved to determine whether the target was met for each student.

Cut score: 5 points
Suggested minimum target for pass/fail system: 65% of families who participate 6 months or more will achieve 5 or more points on the Family Reading Journal Rubric.
Suggested low, mid and high target for two-tier system: low performing=0-55%; mid-performing=56-69%; high-performing=70% or above

The CDA Professional Resource File rubric is designed to evaluate CDA candidates’ Professional Resource Files and to ensure that candidates have adequately addressed the 31 criteria established by the Council for Professional Recognition. Completion of the professional resource file requirements is a required step in the official CDA credentialing process.
The rubric enables course instructors and candidate advisors to evaluate and track student progress toward acceptable completion of the resource file. The evaluation is often conducted in stages as the candidate works on the various components of their resource file. Before a CDA candidate can proceed with their final application for the CDA credential, they must have their entire portfolio reviewed and they must achieve a rating of acceptable or higher on the 30 criteria identified in the Professional Resource File rubric. The CDA Professional Resource File Rubric is aligned with the CDA course textbook (Essentials), the CDA Assessment System and Competency Standards guidelines, and the Field Advisor’s Guide for the CDA Professional Preparation Program.

Suggested minimum target for pass/fail system: 65% of students who complete the required 120 hours of CDA instruction will complete a Professional Resource File with a rating of acceptable on 30 criteria established by the Council for Professional Recognition.

Suggested mid and high target for two-tier system: low performing=0-59%; mid-performing=60-74%; high-performing=75% or above

ACHIEVEMENT
How is achievement measured as defined by the test developer?
What are the DC averages?
What is the national average or norm?
WHAT IS YOUR SUGGESTION FOR AN ACHIEVABLE TARGET/MINIMUM LEVEL ACCEPTABLE FOR ACHIEVEMENT? (so if we go with a yes/no dichotomous scoring scheme)
WHAT IS YOU SUGGESTION FOR A REACH/IDEAL TARGET FOR ACHIEVEMENT? (so if we go with a low/mid/high performance three tiered scoring scheme)

Old Questions:
- Quick overview of this assessment.
- What are the proficiency levels or cut scores?
- How is growth calculated for this assessment (i.e., 3 points is adequate growth for students in the 220-250 range)
- Test reliability if that information is available.- anything else you find relevant about the assessment and how scores are used
- Anything else you find relevant about the assessment and how scores are used.

OVERVIEW:
A portfolio is a purposeful collection of a learner’s work that tells the story of that learner’s experiences, achievement, or growth. A portfolio is not a folder of all the work a learner does, but a collection of work samples selected by the instructor and the learner which each feels best demonstrates student learning. It is a systematic collection that relates to priority instructional goals. A wide variety of types of portfolios exist: working portfolio, performance portfolio, assessment portfolio, group portfolio, application portfolio, and so forth. (Using Portfolio Assessment in EL Civics Classes in California June 2003 Research Digest No. 1; https://www.casas.org/home/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.showContent&MapID=1332) (Lorie)
RATIONALE:
The Adult Education and Family Literacy Act of 1998 requires programs to re-evaluate the way they deliver educational services and the way they assess the effectiveness of these services. In addition to this external factor is the desire of adult educators to make learning more meaningful for learners with individual differences in their abilities, needs and goals. Portfolio assessment links academic skills, life skills, ESOL, workplace skills and family literacy. The portfolio is developmental and shows growth over time. Some other advantages of portfolio assessment are:
o portfolios show the uniqueness of each learner
o portfolios show a more holistic picture of the student than standardized tests do
o portfolios encourage learner self-evaluation, an important life and workplace skill
o portfolios can be used beyond [formal assessments] to help students show employers and prospective employers what they can do
Portfolio assessment is not a substitute for standardized assessment, but rather, they supplement each other. Standardized assessment gives instructors information on the learner's skill relative to the skills of other learners. Portfolio assessment gives instructors and learners information about learners' progress, effort, improvement and achievement relative to their own previous performance on tasks and objectives meaningful to them. (http://literacy.kent.edu/opas/portfoliomodel.html) (Lorie)
PROFICIENCY CUT SCORES:
Cut score as determined during the vetting process. (Lorie)
HOW GROWTH IS MEASURED:
Growth Measure Options:
1) Obtaining designated cut score.
2) Completing a checklist.
Assessment portfolios can be designed to measure virtually any observable skill or process or content area knowledge needed for assessment purposes. A wide range of student products can be included in assessment portfolios as long as predetermined scoring criteria are in place. (Gomez ED388890) (Lorie)
Portfolios can be assessed using a scoring rubric. Rubrics must utilize criteria previously established by a professional body or be vetted by a body of experts in the field of study. (Lorie)
Examples of acceptable rubrics include: Child Development Associate Professional Resource File Rubric (criteria established by Council for Professional Recognition), Family Reading Journal Rubric (Vetted by National Center for Family Literacy. (Lorie)